Delinquency

Delinquency in Europe

What Does This Mean to Me? Discourses and Trajectories in Girls Delinquency

Vera Mónica Duarte, from the ISMAI – Instituto Superior da Maia, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Traditional and New Forms of Crime and Deviance,” under the title “What Does This Mean to Me? Discourses and Trajectories in Girls Delinquency”. Here is the abstract: This poster results from the research that has been developed as part of my PhD in Sociology on female juvenile delinquency. We sought to understand the experiences and the meanings of transgression in the pathways of the lives of girls. The empirical referent of this study included girls admitted to an Juvenile Detention Centre and complying educational court orders in the community under the supervision of Youth Probation Teams of the Greater Lisbon area. The sociological characterization of the study population was inferred from the individual cases analyzed and the interviews which have, through the narrative construction, bring out the meanings of transgressive experiences in interactive contexts. That made possible the exploration of the dominant discourses related with transgression. One was also able to draw up four transgression trajectories: emphasized transgression (by anger and in spiral), rebellious transgression; transgression – influenced and circumstantial transgression.

Schools and Delinquency

Maike Theimann, from the Westf盲lische Wilhelms-Universit盲t M眉nster, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Criminological Theory, Research and Education,” under the title “Schools and Delinquency”. Here is the abstract: As one of the primary agents of socialisation during adolescence schools have become an important place for crime prevention. Today students spend much of their time at school and accordingly less time with their families. This means that the schools' task of conveying social norms and values has become more important. Successful norm socialisation in turn appears to prevent criminal behaviour. With data from the “Crime in the modern city” panel study the impact of school climate (relationship between students and teachers) on norm orientation and later self-reported delinquency is analysed. Using structural equation models, the first four panel waves, when students were about 13 to 16 years old, are evaluated. The findings provide useful information for the practical work of teachers and school principals.

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “Schools and Delinquency”, by Maike Theimann (Proceedings)

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “What Does This Mean to Me? Discourses and Trajectories in Girls Delinquency”, by Vera Mónica Duarte (Proceedings)

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