E-Business

E-Business in Europe

(e)business is (e)business: Researching How Transnational Organized Crime Reacts and Adapts to Esociety

Anita Lavorgna, from the University of Trento, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Traditional and New Forms of Crime and Deviance,” under the title “(e)business is (e)business: Researching How Transnational Organized Crime Reacts and Adapts to Esociety”. Here is the abstract: While it is often assumed that the expansion of the Internet has an impact on crime, there have been few empirical investigations into whether and how this has affected transnational trafficking flows. However, it is hardly surprising that benefits enjoyed by conventional businesses from using the Internet are not lost on criminal groups. In order to better interpret the behavior of criminal groups illegally trading goods and services, it is helpful to consider them as a genre of businessmen coming to grips with peculiar types of import-export activities. The paper argues that by adopting this business model and including the element of professionalization in the definition of transnational organized crime, it's possible to consider a whole range of criminal markets to identify the opportunity system exploited when it comes to the Internet. In this way possibilities for crime prevention can be identified, helping balance an agenda for open Internet with demands for security.

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Further Reading

  • “(e)business is (e)business: Researching How Transnational Organized Crime Reacts and Adapts to Esociety”, by Anita Lavorgna (Proceedings)

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