Illegal Trade

Illegal Trade in Europe

Social Organization and Governance of the Illegal Trade in Tropical Timber in a European Trade Hub

Lieselot Bisschop, from the University College Ghent, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Crime and Society,” under the title “Social Organization and Governance of the Illegal Trade in Tropical Timber in a European Trade Hub”. Here is the abstract: This research responds to the call for more empirical knowledge about transnational environmental crime. It provides insights into the social organisation and governance of the illegal trade in tropical timber within the local research setting of the port of Antwerp (Belgium). Meanwhile, attention is paid to elements throughout the global environmental flows – from locations of origin over transit to destination – that influence the illegal timber trade. This presentation sheds light on the legal and illegal actors involved in illegal tropical timber trade (legal-illegal interfaces). Building on these insights, the research addresses the governance framework for these flows. The research enquires what actors are involved in the governance of tropical timber flows and provides insights into the facilitating and hindering factors for these governance arrangements, for actors individually and in interaction. The frame of analysis used for this is a nodal-networked governance analysis.

Policing the Illegal Trade in Wildlife in Norway

Siv Rebekka Runhovde, from the Norwegian Police University College, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Traditional and New Forms of Crime and Deviance,” under the title “Policing the Illegal Trade in Wildlife in Norway”. Here is the abstract: The illegal trade in wildlife is transnational and is claimed to be linked to organized crime. We know little of the extent of such illegal trade in Norway. The number of seizures made by the law enforcement authorities and the number of people being prosecuted for this type of crime are few, but the numbers are increasing. There is reason to believe that the number of unrecorded cases is substantial and that adequate procedures for detection, registration and prosecution are absent. The presentation will be an introduction to the characteristics of this field, with an emphasis on law enforcement work. Of special interest is the influence of factors such as competence, available resources and cooperation for successful regulation of the illegal trade in wildlife.

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “Policing the Illegal Trade in Wildlife in Norway”, by Siv Rebekka Runhovde (Proceedings)

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “Social Organization and Governance of the Illegal Trade in Tropical Timber in a European Trade Hub”, by Lieselot Bisschop (Proceedings)

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