Journey to Crime

Journey to Crime in Europe

The Journey to Crime in Flanders: a Preliminary Look at the Length of the Journey to Crime

Christophe Vandeviver, from the Ghent University, Institute for International Research on Criminal Policy (IRCP), made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Criminological Theory, Research and Education,” under the title “The Journey to Crime in Flanders: a Preliminary Look at the Length of the Journey to Crime”. Here is the abstract: Current journey to crime studies are flawed in two ways: 1) they heavily rely on local police data limiting the scope of their conclusions to local offending, and 2) although a number of studies hint at the presence of considerably longer crime trips than commonly found, long trips are ignored or removed from the analysis. It follows that the scope of the conclusions of current journey to crime studies is limited to local offending and their empirical design is biased towards finding short crime trips. This paper substantiates the need for more criminological research into long crime trips and provides an initial insight in the length of the journey to crime in Flanders, Belgium. Using multilevel modeling on 5 year public prosecutor data on property crimes from Flanders, the length of the journey to crime and the number of long crime trips is assessed. The criminological implications of the findings are discussed.

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Further Reading

  • “The Journey to Crime in Flanders: a Preliminary Look at the Length of the Journey to Crime”, by Christophe Vandeviver (Proceedings)

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