Police Cooperation

Police Cooperation in Europe

Description of Police and Judicial Co-operation in Criminal Matters

The Concise Encyclopedia of the European Union describes police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters in the following terms: [1] Police and Judicial Co-operation in Criminal Matters is the new heading, introduced in the 1997 Treaty of Amsterdam, of the Maastricht Treaty’s Title VI, previously called Justice and Home Affairs. The change of name reflects a narrower focus, asylum, visas, immigration and frontier controls having been transferred to the supranational ‘first pillar’ of the EU and the Schengen Agreement having been incorporated into the Treaty on European Union by way of a protocol. (Confusingly, the ‘third pillar’ of the EU is still known generically as Justice and Home Affairs.)

The aim of the policy is to pave the way to legal harmonisation and to increase co-operation between the judicial, police and customs authorities of the member states in matters concerning organised crime, terrorism, fraud and arms and drug trafficking (see more in this European encyclopedia). ‘Preventing and combating’ the indeterminate crimes of ‘racism and xenophobia’ is also brought in as a Treaty objective (see more in this European encyclopedia). In general, the wording of the Maastricht Treaty has been largely rewritten to emphasise the guiding role of the Community (including a strengthened Europol) at the expense of the member states. (See also Corpus Juris and Justice and Home Affairs.)

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Notas y References

  1. Based on the book “A Concise Encyclopedia of the European Union from Aachen to Zollverein”, by Rodney Leach (Profile Books; London)

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