Social Crime Prevention

Social Crime Prevention in Europe

Is Social Crime Prevention Disappearing?

Rossella Selmini, from the Regione Emilia, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Crime Prevention,” under the title “Is Social Crime Prevention Disappearing?”. Here is the abstract: The paper investigates some radical changes occurred in definition and practices of social crime prevention in the last decades, with a special focus on the Italian context. Starting from an analysis of the process defined as criminalization of social problems and of urban disorder, these main points will be discussed: 1) how the development of new forms of local governance of crime affected more traditional practices of social crime prevention, with a focus on the use of administrative orders or anti-social behaviours orders in managing crime, disorder or crime – related problems; 2) Is social crime prevention disappearing or it is becoming more and more “invisible”? And, if so, which are the reasons that could explain the increasing invisibility of these practices form the arena of crime prevention in general; 3) How the content of social crime prevention has been affected by the dominance of different crime prevention strategies and particularly by situational crime prevention

Social Crime Prevention Policies in Spain During the Last Decade

Amadeu Recasens, from the University of Porto, made a contribution to the 2012 Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, in the category “Crime Prevention,” under the title “Social Crime Prevention Policies in Spain During the Last Decade”. Here is the abstract: The current social crime prevention policies in Spain are a direct result of the problems of the transition from a totalitarian regime to a democratic one as well as of the social, economic, and inter-administrative conflicts of the 90s. For historical, social and political reasons, crime has usually been associated with police, and crime prevention with police work. Even in the concept of social crime prevention, the word 'crime' has prevailed over the idea of 'social'. Social policies have been developed, but with no specific crime reduction focus. Crime reduction can, at most, be considered a secondary or collateral purpose. This raises the question of why social crime prevention is not a priority and why it is not on the agenda. However, the fact that there are no policies does not mean that there are no actions. To analise these policies (or their lack), we need to examine a set of interactions, interests and roles between public, parapublic and private actors.

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “Social Crime Prevention Policies in Spain During the Last Decade”, by Amadeu Recasens (Proceedings)

Resources

See Also

Further Reading

  • “Is Social Crime Prevention Disappearing?”, by Rossella Selmini (Proceedings)

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